William Wordsworth’s Danish Ghost and the Ballad that Never Was

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

William Wordsworth’s Danish Ghost and the Ballad that Never Was. / Jensen-Rix, Robert William.

In: English Studies: A Journal of English Language, Vol. 98, No. 4, 01.03.2017, p. 393-409.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Jensen-Rix, RW 2017, 'William Wordsworth’s Danish Ghost and the Ballad that Never Was', English Studies: A Journal of English Language, vol. 98, no. 4, pp. 393-409.

APA

Jensen-Rix, R. W. (2017). William Wordsworth’s Danish Ghost and the Ballad that Never Was. English Studies: A Journal of English Language, 98(4), 393-409.

Vancouver

Jensen-Rix RW. William Wordsworth’s Danish Ghost and the Ballad that Never Was. English Studies: A Journal of English Language. 2017 Mar 1;98(4):393-409.

Author

Jensen-Rix, Robert William. / William Wordsworth’s Danish Ghost and the Ballad that Never Was. In: English Studies: A Journal of English Language. 2017 ; Vol. 98, No. 4. pp. 393-409.

Bibtex

@article{00e6e8ce5a2b4157a6c59b484bb80378,
title = "William Wordsworth’s Danish Ghost and the Ballad that Never Was",
abstract = "William Wordsworth’s “A Fragment,” later renamed as “The DanishBoy. A Fragment,” was first published in Lyrical Ballads (1800). It isa vignette of a ghost – a Danish boy – singing in the landscape. Itis the aim of the article to examine the poem in a number ofcontexts that have not previously been discussed. It is argued thatthe singing and harp-playing ghost is a trope for the poetic vigourthat had dissipated under the demands for classical styles ofpoetry. More than any other piece in Lyrical Ballads, “A Fragment”points to the ancient Germanic origin of the new models forpoetic composition that were put forward. The poem participatesin the “bardic revival,” which is closely linked to Romantic-erafiction and antiquarianism. But, it is specifically the idea of theskalds, the ancient Scandinavian bards, which is significant here.Wordsworth’s interest in Norse poetry will be assessed, and so willconcurrent antiquarian claims that skaldic poetry was the directprogenitor of imaginative poetry in England.",
keywords = "Faculty of Humanities, wordsworth, literary tradition, ghosts",
author = "Jensen-Rix, {Robert William}",
note = "DOI: 10.1080/0013838X.2016.1254469 In print in vol. 98, no. 4 (2017)",
year = "2017",
month = "3",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "98",
pages = "393--409",
journal = "English Studies",
issn = "0013-838X",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - William Wordsworth’s Danish Ghost and the Ballad that Never Was

AU - Jensen-Rix, Robert William

N1 - DOI: 10.1080/0013838X.2016.1254469 In print in vol. 98, no. 4 (2017)

PY - 2017/3/1

Y1 - 2017/3/1

N2 - William Wordsworth’s “A Fragment,” later renamed as “The DanishBoy. A Fragment,” was first published in Lyrical Ballads (1800). It isa vignette of a ghost – a Danish boy – singing in the landscape. Itis the aim of the article to examine the poem in a number ofcontexts that have not previously been discussed. It is argued thatthe singing and harp-playing ghost is a trope for the poetic vigourthat had dissipated under the demands for classical styles ofpoetry. More than any other piece in Lyrical Ballads, “A Fragment”points to the ancient Germanic origin of the new models forpoetic composition that were put forward. The poem participatesin the “bardic revival,” which is closely linked to Romantic-erafiction and antiquarianism. But, it is specifically the idea of theskalds, the ancient Scandinavian bards, which is significant here.Wordsworth’s interest in Norse poetry will be assessed, and so willconcurrent antiquarian claims that skaldic poetry was the directprogenitor of imaginative poetry in England.

AB - William Wordsworth’s “A Fragment,” later renamed as “The DanishBoy. A Fragment,” was first published in Lyrical Ballads (1800). It isa vignette of a ghost – a Danish boy – singing in the landscape. Itis the aim of the article to examine the poem in a number ofcontexts that have not previously been discussed. It is argued thatthe singing and harp-playing ghost is a trope for the poetic vigourthat had dissipated under the demands for classical styles ofpoetry. More than any other piece in Lyrical Ballads, “A Fragment”points to the ancient Germanic origin of the new models forpoetic composition that were put forward. The poem participatesin the “bardic revival,” which is closely linked to Romantic-erafiction and antiquarianism. But, it is specifically the idea of theskalds, the ancient Scandinavian bards, which is significant here.Wordsworth’s interest in Norse poetry will be assessed, and so willconcurrent antiquarian claims that skaldic poetry was the directprogenitor of imaginative poetry in England.

KW - Faculty of Humanities

KW - wordsworth

KW - literary tradition

KW - ghosts

M3 - Journal article

VL - 98

SP - 393

EP - 409

JO - English Studies

JF - English Studies

SN - 0013-838X

IS - 4

ER -

ID: 178358043