The graveyard and the Garden: Reading Connectivities in Rana Dasgupta’s The Changeling

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The graveyard and the Garden : Reading Connectivities in Rana Dasgupta’s The Changeling. / Bildsøe, Helle Schulz; Rahbek, Ulla.

I: The Journal of Commonwealth Literature, Nr. January 28, 2017, 2017.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Bildsøe, HS & Rahbek, U 2017, 'The graveyard and the Garden: Reading Connectivities in Rana Dasgupta’s The Changeling', The Journal of Commonwealth Literature, nr. January 28, 2017. https://doi.org/10.1177/0021989416685756

APA

Bildsøe, H. S., & Rahbek, U. (2017). The graveyard and the Garden: Reading Connectivities in Rana Dasgupta’s The Changeling. The Journal of Commonwealth Literature, (January 28, 2017). https://doi.org/10.1177/0021989416685756

Vancouver

Bildsøe HS, Rahbek U. The graveyard and the Garden: Reading Connectivities in Rana Dasgupta’s The Changeling. The Journal of Commonwealth Literature. 2017;(January 28, 2017). https://doi.org/10.1177/0021989416685756

Author

Bildsøe, Helle Schulz ; Rahbek, Ulla. / The graveyard and the Garden : Reading Connectivities in Rana Dasgupta’s The Changeling. I: The Journal of Commonwealth Literature. 2017 ; Nr. January 28, 2017.

Bibtex

@article{87011c4873974c458304941f72956c57,
title = "The graveyard and the Garden: Reading Connectivities in Rana Dasgupta’s The Changeling",
abstract = "In the novel Tokyo Cancelled (2005), Rana Dasgupta explores the contemporary age of globalization as a time of chaotic change. Tokyo Cancelled is composed as a story cycle of 13 tales. This article focuses on one of these tales in particular, “The Changeling”. “The Changeling” relates the tumultuous experiences of Bernard, who is a changeling and archetypal stranger in the pestilence-ridden city of contemporary Paris. The article explores the juxtaposition of systemic and organic networks as the central trope through which Dasgupta explores change and connectivities in a global twenty-first-century moment. We argue that the story presents a process of symbolic transformation whereby the national capital changes into a global city. This change signifies a shift from a national towards a planetary perspective. “The Changeling” comprises at least two different kinds of networks which converge and conflate into one overarching web that is the metropolis: there is a systemic network of control materialized in Montparnasse graveyard and an organic network out of control manifested in a community garden where people congregate to tell stories. Indeed, Dasgupta revisits Benjaminian storytelling as a global networking practice which, while locally contextualized in an impromptu garden in Paris, hints at an awareness of worldwide connectivity.",
keywords = "Faculty of Humanities, Netv{\ae}rk, historiefort{\ae}lling, Rana Dasgupta",
author = "Bilds{\o}e, {Helle Schulz} and Ulla Rahbek",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1177/0021989416685756",
language = "English",
journal = "The Journal of Commonwealth Literature",
issn = "0021-9894",
publisher = "SAGE Publications",
number = "January 28, 2017",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The graveyard and the Garden

T2 - Reading Connectivities in Rana Dasgupta’s The Changeling

AU - Bildsøe, Helle Schulz

AU - Rahbek, Ulla

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - In the novel Tokyo Cancelled (2005), Rana Dasgupta explores the contemporary age of globalization as a time of chaotic change. Tokyo Cancelled is composed as a story cycle of 13 tales. This article focuses on one of these tales in particular, “The Changeling”. “The Changeling” relates the tumultuous experiences of Bernard, who is a changeling and archetypal stranger in the pestilence-ridden city of contemporary Paris. The article explores the juxtaposition of systemic and organic networks as the central trope through which Dasgupta explores change and connectivities in a global twenty-first-century moment. We argue that the story presents a process of symbolic transformation whereby the national capital changes into a global city. This change signifies a shift from a national towards a planetary perspective. “The Changeling” comprises at least two different kinds of networks which converge and conflate into one overarching web that is the metropolis: there is a systemic network of control materialized in Montparnasse graveyard and an organic network out of control manifested in a community garden where people congregate to tell stories. Indeed, Dasgupta revisits Benjaminian storytelling as a global networking practice which, while locally contextualized in an impromptu garden in Paris, hints at an awareness of worldwide connectivity.

AB - In the novel Tokyo Cancelled (2005), Rana Dasgupta explores the contemporary age of globalization as a time of chaotic change. Tokyo Cancelled is composed as a story cycle of 13 tales. This article focuses on one of these tales in particular, “The Changeling”. “The Changeling” relates the tumultuous experiences of Bernard, who is a changeling and archetypal stranger in the pestilence-ridden city of contemporary Paris. The article explores the juxtaposition of systemic and organic networks as the central trope through which Dasgupta explores change and connectivities in a global twenty-first-century moment. We argue that the story presents a process of symbolic transformation whereby the national capital changes into a global city. This change signifies a shift from a national towards a planetary perspective. “The Changeling” comprises at least two different kinds of networks which converge and conflate into one overarching web that is the metropolis: there is a systemic network of control materialized in Montparnasse graveyard and an organic network out of control manifested in a community garden where people congregate to tell stories. Indeed, Dasgupta revisits Benjaminian storytelling as a global networking practice which, while locally contextualized in an impromptu garden in Paris, hints at an awareness of worldwide connectivity.

KW - Faculty of Humanities

KW - Netværk

KW - historiefortælling

KW - Rana Dasgupta

U2 - 10.1177/0021989416685756

DO - 10.1177/0021989416685756

M3 - Journal article

JO - The Journal of Commonwealth Literature

JF - The Journal of Commonwealth Literature

SN - 0021-9894

IS - January 28, 2017

ER -

ID: 182363448